Category Archive: Private Label Design

Market Research Finds Major Growth Potential for Private Label Brands

According to a study from Euromonitor International, “private label brands have become an essential component for consumers in developed markets but there is considerable room for growth in other markets.” How much room for growth? According to the report, 89% of consumers in developed markets already buy private label brands, which offer discounted prices compared to name brands. However, in Russia, for example, the trend has not yet taken off, with only 23% of shoppers choosing private labels. This large gap in adoption rates leaves much room for growth.

In India and France, about a quarter of the population already intends to purchase more private label goods over the next year. According to the study, poor economic situations have led to more openness toward the private labels, and the trend is expected to continue.

To further gain market-share, private label brands are increasingly employing strategies used by more established brands. By ramping up sustainability and ethical considerations, increasing product transparency, and putting greater emphasis on quality, the private labels hope to win over more consumers. Well-known brands have been working to gain consumer trust for decades, whereas private labels may be new to many shoppers. This means they have to work twice as hard to break through that trust barrier, especially for products geared towards children and babies.

But it does seem that more consumers are willing to try something new when it comes to regular pantry staples, including canned goods. Retailers like Aldi, for example, may have carried a stigma years ago for offering off-brand products at a discount, but today are gaining popularity. With this progress, comes a greater market-share for private label brands overall. We expect to see the trend continue as more people put value ahead of brand name.

Star Label Products has years of experience working on private labels that appeal to customers. To learn how we can meet your label requirements, please feel free to request a quote online, or call us at 1-800-394-6900.

Appreciating Customers and Representatives

From October 7th to the 11th this year, companies around the nation celebrated Customer Service Week. You may have missed the festivities, but here at Star Label it’s our mission to provide good customer service year round. This is vital not just for the manufacturing clients we work with directly, but also in our relationships with brokers and other representatives.

Since our founding in 1972, we’ve been serving two main groups – manufacturers and brokers. Sometimes companies will come to us looking for a particular solution, and our sales force is able to guide them through that process. Other times, companies will opt for a broker or other representative to seek out service providers and request quotes on their behalf.

For example, a manufacturer may need a particular type of sticker or label for their product. The manufacturer’s broker then inquires about specifications, and can offer up our product as a choice. He or she then comes to us with the specifications, we offer a quote, and the entire client relationship is handled by the broker.

Respecting and appreciating each customer group is one of Star Label’s competitive strengths. We always ensure client confidentiality, even using blind drop-shipping so our name doesn’t appear on the product – just the broker and/or client names.

Brokers serve a valuable role for many manufacturers, allowing them to operate their businesses without having to worry about sourcing issues. We understand the importance of this job and work hard to meet the needs of the broker as our main contact, and the end-user who will eventually be receiving our products.

What Goes into an Ineffective Private Label Design?

In striving for an effective private label design, it is also important to consider what makes for an ineffective private label design. The number one misstep to avoid is making the label too busy. This can  result in confusion, and can cause customers to question what exactly your product is. There’s a fine line between intriguing and confusing, and it’s the difference between stopping busy shoppers in their tracks and sending them in the other direction.

It’s also important that your label designer be aware of all necessary regulatory requirements. There are rules governing everything from minimum font sizes for pharmaceutical and food items, to the proper way to lay out a nutrition fact label. These regulations are ever changing, and it’s inherent that your designer always be knowledgeable on the most up-to-date requirements.

Lastly, it’s imperative that your label be printable. A design may look great on a computer monitor, but if it can’t be manufactured then there’s not much you can do with it. At Star Label our production graphic artists are excellent designers, and they’re experts at achieving the best results with our printing processes. Even if our customers supply their own designs, we’ll preflight the design files to make sure we can print them. If there are elements that don’t work, such as a font that’s too small or a logo that’s too close to the edge of the label, we’ll work with our customers to modify the design and make it printable. If you’re curious about how to prepare an art file, visit our website: https://www.starlabel.com/how-to-prepare-an-art-file.html.

An effective private label design will entice your customers to pick your product up off the shelf. By working with a designer that helps you avoid common pitfalls and adhere to all the necessary regulatory requirements, you can rest assured that your design is working for you and not against you.

What Goes into an Effective Private Label Design?

When it comes to retail products, there’s limited shelf space and a whole lot of competition. With dozens of products that seem to do the same thing, how do you get a shopper to pick up yours? Different labeling effects and decorating techniques can help do the trick.

The ultimate goal is to get a shopper to pick your product up off the shelf. One way to accomplish this is by using tactile varnishes on your label. Whether it’s raised dots of varnish that look like braille, or soft touch plastics that feel like suede, interesting textures will help intrigue customers and encourage them to grab your product and feel it for themselves.

Iridescent and holographic films are also effective. By changing colors as customers walk by, they can catch customers’ eyes and cause them to look in the direction of your product. Your entire label can be made of these light bending films, or they can be used sparingly as one element of the overall label design.

Another strategy that many private label manufacturers have employed with great success is the inclusion of IRCs—instant redeemable coupons—with their products. These are separate labels that easily peel off of your product, offering shoppers instant savings. Many times this technique is used in conjunction with bundling, whereby a manufacturer will package one product with another related product. Often times this is done to promote a new item, such as shrink wrapping a new shaving gel with a package of razors, or a small stick of deodorant with a bottle of body wash.

Be sure to come back for our next blog, where we look at what goes into an ineffective label design.